Creating Your Standalone Project BPC Plan

Standalone Project BPC Plan does not include Departmental BPC Plans; instead, the BPC activities of all PIs are listed in a single 3-page document for the whole project, as outlined in the Checklist for Standalone Project BPC Plans.

Checklist for Standalone Project BPC Plans

BPCnet has provided a template for you to create your Standalone Project BPC Plan

In Standalone Project BPC Plans, each PI describes a BPC activity they will be engaging in. Guidelines for what to include in these Plans are provided below. PIs may, but do not have to, select an activity from their Departmental BPC Plan. However, Departmental BPC Plans are not submitted as part of Standalone Project BPC Plans.

Document structure:

  • A Standalone BPC Project Plan is limited to 3 pages
    • That space is shared by all PIs from all participating institutions.
  • The Plan describes the specific activity that each PI will engage in.
    • PIs on the project may share activities.
  • Each activity has its own section with a brief descriptive title.
  • Follows the NSF’s current guidelines on formatting in the Proposal & Award Policies and Procedures Guide (PAPPG)

1. Context:

NSF CISE defines a meaningful Project BPC Plan as one that can answer positively to the following question for this section: Does the Plan describe a goal using institutional or local data?

You can address this question by ensuring that the content in this section does the following:

  • For each activity, identifies a goal it will help achieve, which is focused on BPC as defined by NSF CISE.
  • Sets all goals as specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART).
    • Includes relevant, currently available data that is related to the goals.
      • For example, if your goal is to increase the representation of women faculty, included data should relate to gender. 
      • If data are not available, you can collect data as a goal. BPCnet has a curated list of resources for Data and Evaluation/Measurement.
    • Includes data that does not violate privacy or make people feel singled out.
      • If including the numerical measure you seek to improve would violate privacy, you may include a note that the data has been omitted.

2. Intended population(s):

NSF CISE defines a meaningful Project BPC Plan as one that can answer positively to the following question for this section: Does the Plan identify the characteristics of participants from an underrepresented group, including school level (e.g., African-American undergraduates or female high-school students)?

You can address these questions by ensuring that the content in this section does the following:

  • For each activity, identifies the direct participants in the activity and the population that benefits from the activity, which may be the same. 
  • Includes demographic information for the population that benefits from the activity (including age or level of schooling if students).
  • When applicable, includes a procedure for recruiting participants.
    • If the participants are the PIs or have already been recruited, saying that is sufficient. Otherwise, the following are some options for information to include in this section:
      • A detailed recruiting strategy
      • Mention of explicit commitment from relevant partners
      • Mention of past successful recruiting using the same strategy

3. Strategy:

NSF CISE defines a meaningful Project BPC Plan as one that can answer positively to the following question for this section: Does the Plan describe activities that address the goal(s) and intended population(s)? Is there a clear role for each PI and co-PI?

You can address this question by ensuring that the content in this section does the following:

  • Identifies each activity, along with a clear description of what will occur as part of the activity.
  • Describes the activity each PI will engage in alongside the specific actions each PI will take, including frequency/duration/etc of the activity as appropriate.

4. Preparation: 

NSF CISE defines a meaningful Project BPC Plan as one that can answer positively to the following question for this section: Does the Plan describe how the PI is prepared (or will prepare or collaborate) to do the proposed work?

You can address this question by ensuring that the content in this section does the following:

  • Designates realistic PI responsibilities based on the preparation of the PIs, which can be demonstrated in several ways. 
    • The following are some options for information to include in this section:
      • relevant prior BPC experience
      • a plan for how PIs will receive training if needed
      • a plan for working with a BPC expert who will partner with or coach the PIs
      • a resource that articulates and guides the necessary steps

5. Measurement:

NSF CISE defines a meaningful Project BPC Plan as one that can answer positively to the following question for this section: Is there a plan to measure the outcome(s) of the activities?

You can address this question by ensuring that the content in this section does the following:

  • Identifies what data about the activity will be shared in the annual report.
    • This data may be of the activity as a whole or of the PI’s part of it 
    • This data should include some measure of the outcome of the activity. Some intended outcomes may be difficult to measure; in such cases, it is sufficient to measure an intermediate outcome. For example, measuring the demographics of students who receive funding to attend a diversity conference instead of the long-term impact of their attendance.
  • Provides data in the annual report that is sufficient to demonstrate that the PI fulfilled their role in the activity.

 

Example Standalone Project BPC Plans

[Examples of Standalone Project BPC Plans are forthcoming]

Example Activities for your Standalone Project BPC Plans

[Examples Activities for your Standalone Project BPC Plans are forthcoming]